VI. The Lovers

paris-06

Meaning:  You can never know the time and place.  But you can choose how you feel in the mean time.  Focus on what is loving, and while you beware anything too good to be true, remember that one’s attention shapes one’s world, and in the world of best possible actions and outcomes, love wins.


Reverse: There are things in life that can’t be escaped.  Like the law of gravity, some bodies are drawn together in a kind of dance.  While you can’t change some things in life, look inside your own loves for other things you can.  You can only control your own level of commitment.

Marseilles

Sforza-Visconti

Charles VI

In some of the cards Eros has a blindfold on, or his eyes are shut.  What does that say about the Lovers, then, if Cupid had his eyes closed?  Many have a touch of humor to them as well, a stiff hand shake between pre-arranged children, or a chaperone, or whatever is happening to the startled lad in the Marseilles version.

Eros is everywhere in the classical myths.  Like most creatures with wings, it is an active principle of some kind, an interface, or interference if you will.  Belonging to a class of beings known to describe aspects of the human psyche, and used visually to indicate an attraction, like a cartoon balloon.  By the time we reach the Vatican as it stands today, Cupid devolves into the putti, the cherub, the garden decor.  And he’s everywhere, hundreds in a ceiling, love is everywhere.

Portland Vase
Portland Vase

The imagery of the card varies tremendously, from the intimate to the fraternal, but Eros is the central element.  They say the Greeks had several words for love as well, a distinction from English.  Eros was physical love, Philos was love through admiration or community, and Agapis was transcendant love.  Whether this card reads as marriage or an idealism is entirely up to the reader, but it’s always a nice card to see.

Acteon the rapey hunter who is turned by the Lady of Hunt into a stag for his aggression, is depicted by distinction during his enchantment or death, not in the presence of Eros.
Acteon the rapey hunter who is turned by the Lady of Hunt into a stag for his aggression, is depicted by distinction during his enchantment or death, not in the presence of Eros.